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Few paintings in the entire history of art seem as perfect as this one. Vermeer's extraordinary technical mastery , the crystal-clear light which illuminates the scene, the purity of the volumes and the unique psychological distancing of the figures are all characteristics of his work that here reach an extraordinary level of refinement.

Paradoxically, this painting is exceptional within the artist's oeuvre, both in its allegorical subject and for being one of the largest of all his paintings. We do not know what motivated Vermeer to produce it, but his family's efforts to retain it at a period of economic difficulty indicate that it was a picture of which the artist and his descendants were particularly proud.

Some recent authors, particularly Sluijter , have called attention to the fact that it is unlikely that, given the sort of works which he produced throughout his career, Vermeer would make such an affirmation. According to this reading, the painting is demonstration of an allegory of painting's commitment to history, but rather a of the artist's skills, whose power lies in their capacity to turn the transitory into the eternal, and which the artist used to acquire fame and honours.

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1 - is really a 2-part question. First, the teacher wants you to describe how the authors works paint a picture of the role of women in the societies/countries at the time during which the writings were set. To give you an example of what you could conclude from Djebar s "So Vast The Prison" I ve set out an excerpt from text on a website commenting on that novel: (www.duffyandsnellgove.com.au/titles/so_vast_the_prison.htm "For a long time I believed that writing meant dying." begins this extraordinary book, the double-threaded story of one woman s existence set against he unforgiving history of her country. So Vast the Prison is the most ambitious work to date by the woman many consider to be North Africa s most important literary voice. The tragedies of Algerian history are its subject, and particularly the condition of women in Islam. Djebar s fiction, like that of Nadine Gordimer and Edna O Brien, wrestles with issues of oppression and the subtle ways language and history enforce it." "So Vast the Prison tells the story of a modern, educated Algerian woman, raised in the years of Colonial oppression and the Algerian War, whose older brother was imprisoned in France. She watches her marriage disintegrate in a society intolerant of women, even as she marvels at the closeness of women among themselves at the ritual baths and in other gatherings. Woven into the woman s personal life story is the ancient history of her land, including the loss of its early languages, the massive destruction suffered in wars of conquest, and the quirks of chance which enabled traces to remain." The second part of question #1 is for you to to go from what the books "taught" you about women in the times/places of the books settings to zeroing in on the principle female characters in each author s works. Having each character in mind, you are to describe how she coped with the conflict. When the teacher says "cope with the conflicts they encounter," he is giving you a hint about how to answer the first part of question #1. The operative hint-word is "conflicts." This tells you that the female characters were at odds with their roles in their societies. For example (and I m not taking this from any of the authors work): Mother character raises a daughter, wants more for her in the way of education, personal freedom to choose her future, etc. than present society allows. Daughter wants to move to France for education. Father opposes. Mother is torn between her traditional duties/role as a wife which require her to accede to her husband s wishes and her wanting freedom for her daughter which she herself has never been able to enjoy. The teacher wants you to describe the conflict and how each woman addressed it. #2: The teacher is asking you to choose one story and describe its setting. He wants you to point to different examples of the way the author uses the environment to assist her in creating a backdrop for the story and enhancing it. If you think about it, you realize that some authors get their points across with almost dialogue alone (Ernest Heminway, e.g.). Here he wants you to think about how the setting adds to the story. This is an example which is not based on any of the works from which you can choose: The main character is stifled by the social order in her country. She lives in great wealth but cannot leave the house without a male escort and without being completely veiled. The author describes her sitting in a room with heavy red velvet curtains, rich wool and silk rugs, lighting from lamps (not windows) and generously stuffed couches and divans. The author wants you to imagine a woman virtually being smothered by the rich fabrics and unnatural lighting. Of course, this enhances the writer s theme of this woman s oppression which wealth cannot relieve. Got it? Good luck.

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Critical assessments of the Vermeer's Art of Painting with relative images

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A little Trivia about the man and how the name of this colour was born. Between the world wars, artist Maxfield Parrish was the common man s Rembrandt. When a Parrish print was placed in a department store window, crowds gathered to admire it. Hotels hung his dreamscapes in their lobbies. Housewives bought his calendars, viewed them for a year, then cut off the dates and framed the pictures. His 1922 painting Daybreak became a decorating sensation and pop icon of the 1920s, selling more than 200,000 prints. A short, puckish man with piercing blue eyes, Parrish painted the stuff dreams are made of. His trademarks were lush gardens, ecstatic women and his famous "Parrish blue," the color skies must surely be in any Eden worth the name. A generation after his death, Maxfield Parrish remains one of America s best-known and least-known artists. Though his utopias still adorn calendars and posters and his images are sold as computer screen savers and mouse pads, refrigerator magnets and tote bags, few have ever seen his paintings in person. A major retrospective now at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia offers visitors an opportunity to do just that. Going beyond the blue, the exhibition features more than 170 works from Parrish s 68-year career. Those who know him only for his "girls on rocks" will be startled by the imagination, virtuosity and sheer delight of his designs. The show includes his enchanting children s illustrations and magazine covers, his ambitious murals, his machine-tooled maquettes and the lonely landscapes he painted into his 90s. After showing in Philadelphia through September 25, "Maxfield Parrish: 1870-1966" will travel to the Currier Gallery of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire, and to the University of Rochester s Memorial Art Gallery and the Brooklyn Museum of Art, in New York. He is best known for his color (people speak of "Parrish blue"), but his earliest work was b&w. In 1897, he illustrated Kenneth Grahame s "The Walls Were As of Jasper" (one image at left) for the August 1897 issue of Scribners Magazine. He would revisit Grahame s work in two books, Dream Days and The Golden Age in 1899 & 1900. Though both of these and his other 19th century books, Mother Goose in Prose and Knickerbocker s History of New York, were b&w, they all displayed the attention to detail, composition and texture that would make his color work so instantly recognizable. They sell it at Loomes and Tooles or any fine Artists Shops. Hope this helped, Cheers!

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I am really afraid of saying but it sounds like she is over you and trying to avoid you.it could be another thing too All girls are different types sometime even i, a girl can t tell what other girl think.she look like a serious type.this kind of girls like guys who behave natural,softspoken,calm,mature,boys who take a stands,abmtious,clean not fancy dressing and protective kind of guys. try to start a topic with her to know if she is that type.a serious topic.women rights kind of something or what she want to become?best her ambitious or something.if any of these things happen.if she start talking non-stop,her eyes start sparking with light,a small smile came on her face with the question,or she seem very interested in topic,she is that kind of girl, also notice how much thought she put in the subject to assure she is that kind. next,start behaving naturally,she propbably start dating you because of this.all things you said above are very good for nice and soft kind of girls,dreamy and clingy,mature girls can hadle it.but not serious,soft type.normally these kind of girls are easy to please.you really want to see her happy, right?you are doing all these big things.you are good boyfriend.too much just shrink these kind of girl.she want you to be romanic in alone not in public.focus on small things then big,like bring her fav food/snack when you meet her.Through a compliement out of blue,be caring,like she said i want to to do that, remember it.like if you see a small cut on her hand ask her about what happend and did she put the medicine on it,not more then that if she didn t scold her a little.on a day you see she is wearing nice clothes,remember them color and print and after somedays ask her to wear them again when meeting you,don t forget to compliment her.she will surly like her.whenever she say she love you always reply back seriously. i may going to get a thumbs down.